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Node.js Blueprints – A good how-to book that covers plenty of JS frameworks and tools – #programming #bookreview

7338OS_Node.js Blueprints (1)

 

Node.js Blueprints

Develop stunning web and desktop applications with the definitive Node.js

Krasimir Tsonev

(Packt Publishing paperback, Kindle)

 

Krasimir Tsonev’s new Node.js Blueprints book has proven helpful for me as I try to become more adept at using Node.js and a few of the many software packages that can work with it, such as AngularJS, Backbone.js, Ember.js, ExpressJS, Grunt.js and Gulp.js.

If you’ve never used Node.js before, here is its official description from the Nodejs.org site operated by Joyent, Inc.:

“Node.js is a platform built on Chrome’s JavaScript runtime for easily building fast, scalable network applications. Node.js uses an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient, perfect for data-intensive real-time applications that run across distributed devices.”

The focus of Node.js Blueprints is on showing readers the basics of how to use various frameworks, libraries and tools that can help them develop real-world applications that run with Node.js.

Tsonev’s approach is to introduce several popular frameworks, libraries and tools, provide code examples and explain the roles of various sections or modules within the code. The goal in each chapter is to help the reader learn how to work with a framework or other package and create a simple application — a blueprint for something bigger — that can run with Node.js

The book is aimed at intermediate-level JavaScript developers, especially “web developer[s] with experience in writing client-side JavaScript,” who are interested in using Node.js in web and desktop applications.

The 12-chapter, 268-page book is structured as follows:

Tsonev’s well-written book introduces a lot of good material to help you get started. After that, you have to do the work to get better at using the various frameworks and tools. But the writer gives you plenty of possibilities to start with in your quest to become a better developer.

You may encounter an occasional typo in the book’s printed code. Thus, be sure to download the available code examples for reference, even if you prefer to type in code by hand (one of my favorite ways to learn, too).

And, during the lengthy process to write, edit, and publish the book, some of the software has changed to newer versions than are called for in the text–which may affect how something works in certain small areas of code.  Indeed, in programming books that rely on several different software packages, changes always happen, and those changes seldom are convenient to the printing deadline.

So if something doesn’t work the way you expect, and you are positive your hand-typed code has no known mistakes, don’t yell at the author. Download the code examples. Look for the publisher’s errata files. Seek out comments at book sites such as the readers’ reviews on Amazon, as well as comments on social media sites and specialized sites where JavaScript and Node.js developers hang out. Also take a look at the “official” websites for the frameworks and tools.

I have been wanting to learn more about working with Node.js, and Node.js Blueprints definitely is filling that need.

Si Dunn

Author